Holding Out For A Hero

Holding Out For A Hero

When you think of a hero, what criteria do you use?

Brave? Well that’s a given. Whether I’m wearing my female hat or writer’s hat, a man has to have certain qualities to rank up there with our nation’s military finest. Did you read the book Lone Survivor or see the movie? Heroes!

Other than being strong, fast, courageous, and fearless, I like a hero who carries himself with confidence. The kind of confidence that says he’s doing the right things for the right reasons. His inner strength must be so ingrained that tenderness is freely given and isn’t a threat to his masculinity. Secure in his masculinity, he’ll allow himself to rescue an abandoned kitten or dog without feeling a display of kindness might jeopardize his reputation as a hard-ass.

Have you ever seen a firefighter drop to his knees and resuscitate a dog or cat that had been overcome by smoke inhalation…hero.

Take Bonnie Tyler’s hit song from the 60s, “Holding Out For A Hero” for example. (All you youngsters who haven’t heard this song, download it. It will be the best .99 you ever spent.) Lyrics are copyrighted so I can’t use them here, but she nailed what most women want in a hero.

Here’s a real life example. How about Peyton Manning, the quarterback for the Denver Broncos? His prowess on the football field is well known, but for me, the class he demonstrates when he’s not playing makes him a hero.

Last year, Ray Lewis and the Baltimore Ravens dealt Manning and the Broncos a devastating loss. After the game, Manning went to the Ravens locker room. You see, Lewis was retiring. But it was after Lewis had showered, changed into his suit, and finished with the press conference, that he learned Manning and his family were waiting for him.

Manning lost that game, but he stayed long after his teammates had left just to shake Ray Lewis’s hand and wish him the best.

That’s class with a capital C. And I want my hero’s to have that kind of classy confidence.

What qualities do you look for in a man? Are they the same expectations you have for a hero in a romance novel?

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About Jerrie Alexander

Comments

  1. I enjoyed your comments and agree with men who aren’t afraid to be gentle as one hero criteria. Where did the idea come from that heroes have to be super-human? Many of us rise above the ordinary when called. I think the hero gene is in every human, we just don’t see our own strengths. Thanks for the interesting blog post.

    [Reply]

    Jerrie Alexander Reply:

    Ashantay, thanks for stopping by! I totally agree with you. We all have the ability to step up when needed.

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  2. Kimberly Quinton says:

    Hi Jerrie!

    I love that song and will now have it in my head all day! Could be worse ;)

    I do like a hero in life and in books that has a kind, thoughtful side, even if it’s buried deep and it takes the heroine a while to dig it out. Great example of classy with Manning. And classy to me is also a man (or a woman) who works to make the people around them feel comfortable, no matter what.

    Great post!

    [Reply]

    Jerrie Alexander Reply:

    Kimberly! Thanks for coming by. Great description of classy! And you’re spot on, we should all work to make those around us comfortable.

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  3. marsharwest says:

    You’ve made some really good points, Jerrie. I like Ashatay’s comments, too. Yes, we’ve had Superman, but a being a hero doesn’t take super-human traits. In a way, I think, so what? Of course he’s a hero, he’s super strong or whatever the mix of gifts are the Superhero has. The real heroes are regular men and women who step up when the crises hits. The ones who run toward the bomb blast to help rather than away. And what about the men and women who get up every day and go to what appears to be a dead end job to make sure they have food for their kids to eat. The ones who stay up when they’re exhausted to help with homework. I know these aren’t generally the ones we write about.
    Kim nailed it too. “And classy to me is also a man (or a woman) who works to make the people around them feel comfortable, no matter what.” The hero is the one who shares the glory, not hogs it all. Very thought provoking post, Jerrie.

    [Reply]

    Jerrie Alexander Reply:

    Hey, Marsha! Thanks for dropping by. The comments have been spot on. You’re right! Our everyday heroes are around us all the time.

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